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khstar126:

gnorcs:

pleiadic:

gnorcs:

why are mini m&ms so much better than normal m&ms 

because there’s this thing called the square-cube law (x) which basically says that as volume decreases, so does the surface area, but not as quickly (by the square of the scaling factor, instead of by the cube), which means that smaller m&ms have a higher candy:chocolate ratio than normal ones

i was gonna call u a nerd… but.. thats actually….kinda…interesting

Kevin stop hitting on Double D

spamsmut:

aintnobodygottimeforthisfandom:

himaruyavevo:

himaruyavevo:

himaruyavevo:

starting today all blogs without the following image will be deleted within 24 hours

image

wtf this was originally england singing who changed it to germany with no eyebrows or nose

oh for fucks sake

ITS SNOOP LOOPS NOW OH M Y GOD

I HAVE TO REBLOG THIS TO MY PORN BLOG BECAUSE NOW IT’S FUCKEN RYU WITH A BUNCHA DICKS MEGA NSFW

breadonly:

GTA6 map leaked

death-by-lulz:

meowllenginsberg:
joe is REALLY depressed after last nite’s government fiasco, refuses to get out of bed, keeps sayin “i wish i was more like john stamos”

death-by-lulz:

meowllenginsberg:

joe is REALLY depressed after last nite’s government fiasco, refuses to get out of bed, keeps sayin “i wish i was more like john stamos”

black-flip:

fuks:

SAIL

a must see

marill666:

whats the fucking point of meeting sonic the hedgehog if we cant discuss the fine art of memes with one another

marill666:

whats the fucking point of meeting sonic the hedgehog if we cant discuss the fine art of memes with one another

theknight0fspace:

davidstrider:

2013 is almost over but my school papers still fucking look like

image

I know how you feel. It feels like yesterday when the british government refused to let us settle past the Appalachians.

unregistered-hypercam2:

guess who’s cum is in the stratosphere right now

unregistered-hypercam2:

guess who’s cum is in the stratosphere right now

iguanamouth:

cheppo:

iguanamouth:

together at last

excuse me i have something important 2 add

image

image

hes here

meladoodle:

i keep trying to kiss my cheek in the mirror but my reflection keeps going for the lips… im not ready, okay.. im just not ready for that yet. cheek first. no, not again. there you go to the lips again.

kalefestival:

bodie

bag-of-dirt:

Prison identification photograph of U.S. Army POW Staff Sgt. Joseph R. Beyrle taken in Stalag XII-A. Beyrle is thought to be the only American soldier to have served with both the U.S. Army and Soviet Army during the war. On 6 June 1944, D-Day, the Douglas C-47 Skytrain transport aircraft Beyrle was in came under enemy fire over the Normandy coast, and he was forced to jump from the exceedingly low altitude of 120 meters. After landing in Saint-Côme-du-Mont, he lost contact with his fellow paratroopers, but succeeded in blowing up a power station before being apprehended by the Germans a few days later. Over the next seven months, Beyrle was held in seven different German POW camps. He escaped twice, only to be recaptured each time. Beyrle was taken to the Stalag III-C POW camp in Alt Drewitz bei Küstrin in Neumark, state of Brandenburg (now Drzewice, Lubusz Voivodeship, Poland), about 50 mi (80 km) east of Berlin where he escaped in early January 1945. Knowing the Soviets were advancing much quicker from the east than the Americans, British and others were from the west, Beyrle headed eastward. Encountering the Soviet 1st Guards Tank Army in the middle of January, he raised his hands, holding a pack of Lucky Strike cigarettes, and shouted in Russian, “Amerikansky tovarishch!" ("American comrade!"). Beyrle was eventually able to persuade the battalion’s commander, who, incidentally, was the legendary Alexandra Samusenko, possibly the only Soviet female tank officer with the rank of Guards Captain, to allow him to fight alongside the unit on its way to Berlin. Thus, Beyrle began his month-long stint in a Soviet tank battalion, where his demolitions expertise was appreciated. Beyrle’s new battalion was the one that freed one of his former camps, Stalag III-C, at the end of January. But, in the first week of February, he was wounded during an attack by German Luftwaffe Stuka (Junkers Ju 87) dive bombers. He was evacuated to a Soviet hospital in Landsberg an der Warthe (now Gorzów Wielkopolski, in Poland), where he received a visit from Soviet Marshal Georgy Zhukov, who, intrigued by the only non-Soviet in the hospital, learned his story through an interpreter, and provided Beyrle with official papers in order to rejoin the American forces. Joining a Soviet military convoy, Beyrle arrived at the U.S. embassy in Moscow in February 1945, only to learn that he had been reported by the U.S. War Department as killed in action on 10 June 1944 on French soil. A funeral mass had been held in his honor in his hometown of Muskegon, Michigan and his obituary was published in the local newspaper. Sgt. Beyrle returned home to Michigan on 21 April 1945. He would marry in 1946, coincidentally, in the same church and by the same priest who held his funeral mass two years earlier. Beyrle died in 2004 at the age of 81. His son John Beyrle would serve as the United States Ambassador to Russia from 2008 to 2012. Stalag XII-A, Limburg an der Lahn, Hesse, Germany. July 1944.

bag-of-dirt:

Prison identification photograph of U.S. Army POW Staff Sgt. Joseph R. Beyrle taken in Stalag XII-A. Beyrle is thought to be the only American soldier to have served with both the U.S. Army and Soviet Army during the war. On 6 June 1944, D-Day, the Douglas C-47 Skytrain transport aircraft Beyrle was in came under enemy fire over the Normandy coast, and he was forced to jump from the exceedingly low altitude of 120 meters. After landing in Saint-Côme-du-Mont, he lost contact with his fellow paratroopers, but succeeded in blowing up a power station before being apprehended by the Germans a few days later. Over the next seven months, Beyrle was held in seven different German POW camps. He escaped twice, only to be recaptured each time. Beyrle was taken to the Stalag III-C POW camp in Alt Drewitz bei Küstrin in Neumark, state of Brandenburg (now Drzewice, Lubusz Voivodeship, Poland), about 50 mi (80 km) east of Berlin where he escaped in early January 1945. Knowing the Soviets were advancing much quicker from the east than the Americans, British and others were from the west, Beyrle headed eastward. Encountering the Soviet 1st Guards Tank Army in the middle of January, he raised his hands, holding a pack of Lucky Strike cigarettes, and shouted in Russian, “Amerikansky tovarishch!" ("American comrade!"). Beyrle was eventually able to persuade the battalion’s commander, who, incidentally, was the legendary Alexandra Samusenko, possibly the only Soviet female tank officer with the rank of Guards Captain, to allow him to fight alongside the unit on its way to Berlin. Thus, Beyrle began his month-long stint in a Soviet tank battalion, where his demolitions expertise was appreciated. Beyrle’s new battalion was the one that freed one of his former camps, Stalag III-C, at the end of January. But, in the first week of February, he was wounded during an attack by German Luftwaffe Stuka (Junkers Ju 87) dive bombers. He was evacuated to a Soviet hospital in Landsberg an der Warthe (now Gorzów Wielkopolski, in Poland), where he received a visit from Soviet Marshal Georgy Zhukov, who, intrigued by the only non-Soviet in the hospital, learned his story through an interpreter, and provided Beyrle with official papers in order to rejoin the American forces. Joining a Soviet military convoy, Beyrle arrived at the U.S. embassy in Moscow in February 1945, only to learn that he had been reported by the U.S. War Department as killed in action on 10 June 1944 on French soil. A funeral mass had been held in his honor in his hometown of Muskegon, Michigan and his obituary was published in the local newspaper. Sgt. Beyrle returned home to Michigan on 21 April 1945. He would marry in 1946, coincidentally, in the same church and by the same priest who held his funeral mass two years earlier. Beyrle died in 2004 at the age of 81. His son John Beyrle would serve as the United States Ambassador to Russia from 2008 to 2012. Stalag XII-A, Limburg an der Lahn, Hesse, Germany. July 1944.

mostlycatsmostly:

(by Jagerbunny)

queen-bitchass:

espressobean:

Man with suit made of Mentos is dunked in a tank full of Diet Coke.

DID HE SURVIVE